Sep 052016
 

The Atlantic ran another article this past week about safe spaces and free speech on college campuses. I generally think the to-do about these matters is overblown, but among “educational elites” this is a thing. After news got out about the University of Chicago’s letter to incoming students regarding the topic, concerned parties weighed in again — hence, the piece in The Atlantic.

Reading it, my takeaway — and I’m sure it was entirely not intended — was that much of this “debate” is fueled by poor scholarship and educational failure. As described by Dr. Levinovitz in the essay, the participants seem to have ideas about higher education that I find disturbing and perplexing. Safe space proponents, he says, insult and undermine discussion; meanwhile, he maintains you have to offend and have antagonistic exchanges to develop minds. Both approaches are negative and suggest the core issue is an altogether different thing than the points of debate. I don’t think the problem is free speech or censorship, so much as it is a failure of our academics to provide proper training in learned exchanges.

Levinovitz argues against safe spaces and then (ironically) complains that students don’t feel safe to share their opinions, especially on their religious convictions, in his Religious Studies classes. I wonder if he is confused about the purpose of his academic offerings or thinks that he is teaching Christian Apologia 101 rather than Intro to Religion. Religious Studies is not theology; it’s purpose is to understand varieties of religious thought — not to learn how to argue your faith. That the professor cannot appreciate the difference between the two is troubling and begs the question as to how he can instruct students in critical analysis of religious topics and teach them to approach the topic with sophistication.

Really, why would students debate their religious beliefs in an academic environment? Isn’t the obvious purpose of studying religious thought different than that? You don’t need to go to college to learn to espouse your beliefs. WordPress is glad to host a blog for you to do just that on your own, and there are safe spaces — churches, temples, etc — where you are free to make statements of faith to your heart’s content. The purpose of studying religion in higher education is of a different sort: it’s to learn, through reading and analysis of different religious writings, to understand a variety of sacred thought and culture.

Frankly, no one gives a shit what a nineteen year old who has never studied a topic before thinks about it. The point of education is to expose students to different ideas and teach them to analyze those takes so they can have well-formulated positions. Professors should be exposing students to thinking in their disciplines and teaching them to critically approach their topics — not encouraging them to profess their uneducated opinions. If an instructor is doing the latter instead of the former, they fail their students and their professional responsibilities. Worry first about your students having informed insights before you worry about where they will have the freedom to say them (and they may just be able to swing the last part for themselves — as the current kerfuffle shows).

I fear for the state of higher education if professors do so poorly in “teaching” their students, and, again, one need not attend a university to learn to shout down those with differing opinions, so they fail too if they aren’t teaching students how to debate issues with respect — and evidence.* The first day of every one of my classes includes setting ground rules of civility and welcoming participation. It’s part of my role as instructor to facilitate that and ensure that the class succeeds in it.

Where will students learn to be collegial if not in college? Differences of intellectual thought are normal and require practice to handle well. Training is necessary, and that includes in how to engage learnedly. Educated debate is most definitely not — as Levinovitz asserts — combat, nor it is a violent activity. My God, if you think it’s that, you are doing it wrong and should never be training novices in the way that they should go. First, do no intellectual harm, sir. Civility should be essential in any good education.

A combative view of ideological differences and discussion is a recent plague in our society, and from Levinovitz’s description, it appears common on both sides of the free speech/safe space debate. Disrespectful discourse indicates a failure of higher education in America doing what it exists to do. Our professors apparently do not know better, regrettably, and are not (or cannot) teach their students what they do not know to do. It seems we lack the shared value of respect toward others, and I oppose that. If we cannot hold each other in regard in our differences, safe spaces are not the solution — it’s reform of the educators charged with training us to do it.

m[-_-]

*As opposed to making random biased assumptions not based on evidence like that there is a correlation between those who complain the “loudest” about the need for safe spaces and bitching about the cultural appropriation of yoga. Is there an actual study proving this connection? Who would fund that? I mostly need to know because I have actual research that needs funding and that source apparently gives money to any old “inquiry.”

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